Tag Archives: victorian

Bicycle Face: A guide to Victorian cycling diseases

  “Don’t cultivate a bicycle face.” — Don’ts for women on bicycles, New York World, 1895 Medical professionals kept a watchful eye on cycling when it rose in prominence as a fashionable form of leisure for men and women in … Continue reading

Posted in Research | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ladies Cycling Clubs: The Origins and Politics of Victorian Women’s Bicycling Associations

The wheelmen’s club, outfitted in dapper uniforms and racing en masse down a country road, is one of the enduring images of late Victorian masculine associational culture. Cycling clubs may have started out as male reserves, especially during the highwheeler … Continue reading

Posted in Research | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Battersea Park Cyclists’ Row

The bicycle literally and figuratively transported women beyond the bounds of the home and into public space in late-Victorian London. Not surprisingly, this incursion into open areas, such as city streets and country lanes, caused mild moral panic among a … Continue reading

Posted in Research | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Christmas Cycling Wish, c. 1898

Happy holidays to all of you out there on two wheels! A Christmas Wish May you steer a steady course and everything go well, No obstacles your pathway cross, when you ring the belle! Image source: Christmas Card, c. 1898 … Continue reading

Posted in Research | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Imperial Bicyclists: Women travel writers on wheels in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century world

Early one morning at the end of August 1884, Elizabeth Robins Pennell and her husband Joseph Pennell strapped their luggage to their tricycle and wheeled out of Russell Square before anyone else was stirring. They headed south toward London Bridge, … Continue reading

Posted in Research | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Spanner of One’s Own: Liberation and Mechanics in Maria Ward’s “Bicycling for Ladies,” 1896

  In 1896, Maria E Ward published a comprehensive instruction manual aimed at women interested in cycling. Her book, Bicycling for Ladies, shown above, was one of many similar titles published in the cycle craze era. Ward’s liberated approach, however, … Continue reading

Posted in Research | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment